Saturday, September 15, 2012

Country Feature - Columbia!!

 Today I am continuing my tour of South America to Columbia.

Columbia is in the northwest part of Brazil and connects South America to Central America. Here are some facts I learned about Columbia from the Compassion website:
-two of the main exports are coffee and oil
-drug trafficking is a huge problem (I'm sure we've all heard of the Columbia drug cartels)
-73% of the country is urban
-Compassion works in the densely populated northern regions
-Columbia has been violently struggling to find its identity since the 19th century
-it has the oldest democracy in Latin America
-peaceful coexistence among the multiethnic and multiparty groups in this country remains elusive
-there is constant political and social turmoil with different factions in constant battle for power
-plagued by political corruption, drug wars, guerrilla activity and terrorist violence

This is what the US Department of State has to say about Columbia:
-education is free for the first five years of primary school (only five years are offered in many rural areas)
-Infant mortality rate: 16/1000
-third most populated country in Latin America (after Brazil and Mexico)
-37% of Colombians live below the poverty line
-there are large income disparities and inadequate social services
-Columbia has faced a long history of violence and political shifts

In the slums of Columbia, homes are made from dirk floors, brick or wood walls, and aluminum or tile roofs. Those that are able to find work make around $69-$320 per month.Communities are in need of paved streets, schools, qualified teachers, employment opportunities, improvement of public services, libraries, vocational training centers, parks, stable employment opportunities, recreational facilities, educational materials, drug abuse prevention programs, houses, affordable education, clean water, sewer systems, food, garbage collection services, law enforcement, and hospitals.

These are some kids in Columbia that have been waiting for a sponsor for almost a year! Will you be the one that changes their life?

This is Lino. He is five-years-old and lives in the coastal community of El Porfin, Columbia. He lives with his father (who is sometimes employed), his mother (who maintains the home), and one sibling. Adults in this area earn about $69 per month.





This is Jerzon. He is five-years-old and lives in the coastal community of Barrio Bellavista, Columbia. He lives with father (who is sometimes employed) and his mother (who is sometimes employed) and six siblings. Adults in this area earn about $83 per month.

This is Miguel. He is six-years-old and lives in the coastal community of Vista Hermosa, Columbia. He lives with his mother (who is sometimes employed) and three siblings. Adults in this area earn about $213 per month.

This is Anyely. She is nine-years-old and lives in Barrio 2 de Septiembre, Columbia. She lives with her grandmother (who is sometimes employed) and one sibling. Adults in this area earn about $104 per month.

This is Nailin. She is four-years-old and lives in the coastal community of Los Alpes 1, Columbia. She lives with her father (who is sometimes employed) and her mother (who maintains the home) and two siblings. Adults in this area earn about $72 per month.

This is Ashleen. She is five-years-old and lives in the coastal community of Chigorod├│, Columbia. She lives with her grandmother (who is sometimes employed) and one sibling. Adults in this areas earn about $126 per month.

As always, if none of these children speak to your heart I invite you to find one that does from Columbia, or somewhere else.

Love & Peace.

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